Rachel Brooke: A Killer’s Dream

Rachel Brooke Killer's Dream feature

  I developed a kind of crush on Rachel Brooke in the spring of 2011 when she released Down in the Barnyard, and now Brooke back with A Killer’s Dream and even better. Upon listening to A Killer’s Dream, it was immediately impressive how Brooke has expanded her band, her sound, and her talents. The clear, strong voice and compelling stories now paint their pictures with more vibrant shades of honky tonk, rhythm and blues, and fiery torch songs. Brooke strides with appealing confidence through songs both sultry and sentimental, knowing and spirited. If an artist’s albums are like the growth charts that tracked our heights when we were kids, Brooke has shot up like a weed.   “A Killer’s Dream” – Rachel Brooke   “The Black Bird” – Rachel Brooke   Rachel Brooke Official Website Rachel Brooke @ Twitter Rachel Brooke @ Facebook

Rachel Brooke: I Can’t Sing Anything That Wasn’t Sung Before

Rachel Brooke

It took me a while to come around to country music on the whole. Sure, I had some questionable dalliances with country artists in my youth. You would have found Oak Ridge Boys and Randy Travis tapes stacked in with my Duran Duran and Depeche Mode tapes. And my mother’s housework was often accompanied by Kenny, Dolly and Alabama when she wasn’t playing the Rolling Stones, Pat Benatar and the Pointer Sisters. But I soon became the kind of person who, when asked what kind of music she listened to, answered, “Almost everything… except country.” Then, eventually, I was turned on to the country music of the 1940s and ’50s. Ernest Tubb, Hank Sr., Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash… you know the bunch I’m talking about. On her second solo album, Down in the Barnyard, Rachel Brooke’s music hearkens back to this time in country music when the keys to success were a steady rhythm, a clear and honest voice and a good story. But, like myself – and like many of you reading this, Brooke has probably spent a little more time in her life cozied up to Joy Division than kicking back with Merle Haggard, and this adds a … Continue reading